Aortic Disease and Social Security Disability Benefits

The Social Security Administration (SSA) offers two different disability programs to those who suffer from long-term or permanent disabilities, such as aortic disease. These programs include the Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) program and the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program. Each program has its own technical requirements in order to be eligible, but for either program you must meet the medical requirements that have been set forth by the SSA.
Meeting the SSA’s Medical Requirements
When you apply for Social Security Disability benefits, the SSA compares your condition to a listing of conditions known as the Blue Book. The Blue Book contains all of the conditions that may qualify an individual for benefits from the SSA, along with the criteria that must be met under each condition.
Within the Blue Book, each condition is given its own section. When applying for disability benefits due to aortic disease, your condition will be compared to the criteria set forth in Section 4.10 of the Blue Book, which covers aneurysm and/or dissection of an aorta or major branches, due to any cause.
To qualify for benefits under this section of the Blue Book, you must have a diagnosis of the condition that has been demonstrated by appropriate medically acceptable imaging, with dissection not controlled by prescribed treatment. Learn more here.
The Technical Requirements of the Disability Programs
If you meet the medical eligibility requirements of the Social Security Administration’s Blue Book, you must then also meet the criteria of the different Social Security Disability programs. As mentioned above, the SSA disability programs each have their own criteria. To qualify for one or both programs, you must be able to prove that you meet the program’s criteria.
SSDI Benefits Eligibility
To qualify for SSDI benefits, you must have earned a certain number of work credits prior to becoming disabled. As a general rule, you must have earned a total of 40 work credits through prior work activity with 20 of those credits being earned within the last 10 years. The exact number of credits needed depends on your age, and younger applicants need fewer credits to qualify for SSDI benefits.
SSI Benefits Eligibility
Unlike SSDI benefits, you don’t need any work history to qualify for SSI benefits. The SSI program is a needs-based program. To qualify for this program you must meet the SSA’s financial requirements. As of 2014, this means that you cannot have a household income that exceeds $721 per month as an individual or $1,082 as a couple. Your household assets must also not exceed $2,000 as an individual or $3,000 as a couple, excluding your home and one vehicle. Learn more about social security programs here.
The Social Security Disability Application Process
When you apply for Social Security Disability benefits, it’s your job to prove to the SSA that you are completely unable to maintain gainful employment due to your disability. That means gathering the medical evidence to prove that your condition meets the Blue Book criteria and submitting that evidence along with the forms that the SSA requires you to fill out. When filling out these forms, make sure you leave no sections blank and answer each question with as much detail as possible to help the SSA understand how you qualify for benefits.
After the SSA receives your application, they may ask you to go for a consultative exam. The purpose of this exam is to determine the extent of your disability. It’s important to remember that your own medical records and written statements from your treating physicians are likely to weigh more heavily in a decision than the determination of this exam.
About two to four months after the date of your application, you can expect to receive a decision from the Social Security Administration. If you are awarded benefits, you will be notified as to when benefits will begin, what benefits you are entitled to and how much you will be receiving each month. If you are denied benefits, you have 60 days from the date of the denial notice to appeal the SSA’s decision.
Appealing a Denial of Benefits
If you need to appeal a denial, you may want to consider retaining the services of a disability attorney. Oftentimes applications are denied due to a lack of medical evidence or mistakes made on the claim forms. A disability attorney can help you determine the weak areas of your claim and begin to gather the evidence necessary to strengthen your appeal. He or she can also represent you before an administrative law judge at your disability hearing, which is when you have the greatest chance of overturning the SSA’s decision to deny benefits.
It’s important to note that you should never be discouraged if your initial application for benefits is initially denied. Many current Social Security Disability recipients who receive benefits obtained those benefits through the process of a disability appeal. With the right planning and the help of a disability attorney, you can increase your chances of receiving the benefits you deserve.

Author: Lisa Giorgetti, Community Liaison, Social Security Disability Help

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